9 Chicken Breeds Choose this kind of hen and make real thing of your backyard coop.

These 9 types of chickens are among the most valued varieties of backyard hens, from egg production (spoiler alert: not laying eggs each day) to regal plumage. If you’re searching for the most friendly chicken breed (such that you can get a Sussex to eat out of your hand!) or the best chicken breed for beginners (see the nice, relaxed, and collected Plymouth Rock!), the nature, temper and average production (including the color of the shell) of the best chicken breeds of this kind are shown on our chicken breeds map. Couldn’t your mind make up? There is no problem at all mixing multiple races in a single coop. Indeed, a “curated flock” is all the more attractive as a well-appointed bed.

Now you probably want to inquire, “Where chicks can I purchase, I’ve decided what kind of chicken I want to raise?” 9 Chicken Breeds Chicken specialist and author Kathy Shea Mormino of The Chicken Chick says, “Buying chicks online is a secure way of bringing hens around. 9 Chicken Breeds But only a national Poultry Improvement Plan approved hatchery, including mychickencoops.com. 9 Chicken Breeds advised to purchase it. Local farms such as Tractor Supply Co. have frequent seasonal chickens, but generally smaller race types. 9 Chicken Breeds Psst: Unless around 20-24 weeks old, hens will not start developing eggs. 9 Chicken Breeds Consider a ‘started pullet’ that is a hen 15 to 22 weeks old if you don’t want to wait that long. She would very soon start laying eggs after she was used to her new environment.

Now you can tackle the coop more effectively. 9 Chicken Breeds Check out these very inspiring chicken co-ops for inspirational and simple construction, or shop 9 Chicken Breeds those chicken co-ops you can purchase today by clicking and buying. 9 Chicken Breeds If you’re a chicken keeper for the first time, also check out our helpful guide for what you need to do for the first time.

9 Chicken Breeds Now go get clucking!

1 Araucana Hen

Araucana Hen

Araucana Hen

APPEARANCE: The Araucana upright is clearly marked with the tufts and no tail at the cheeks. Its plumes are available in an amazing color range: black, white, buff, silver, dust, and more.

TEMPERAMENT: This hen is very energized and attractive for some owners, while others have a job.

EGG PRODUCTION: This race is normally placed in this prized country-blue coat, approximately 150 eggs per year.

2 Australorp Hen

Australorp Hen

Australorp Hen

APPEARANCE: The short, bright black plumage with green and purple tinges is a soft duck.

TEMPERAMENT: Australorps are gentle and cramped spaces tolerable, making them an excellent reproduction for beginners and little chicken coops.

EGG PRODUCTION: With this hard egg layer, two hundred to three hundred light brown eggs a year are not uncommon. (A record of 364 eggs in 365 days is held in Australian Australorp)

3 Buff Orpington Hen

Buff Orpington Hen

Buff Orpington Hen

APPEARANCE: A complete coat of billowy golden-yellow feathers provides both a royal air and protection against cold winter to this British heritage of hen.

TEMPERAMENT: Buff Orpington is smart and socially friendly. Until 2016, the chicken craze was seen as endangered, but the pattern was reversed.

EGG PRODUCTION: During the summer months, they are “brewing” and so the number of eggs is lower by about 150 brown eggs annually.

 

 

 

 

 

4 White Leghorn Hen

White Leghorn Hen

White Leghorn Hen

Appearance: This short, noisy Italian import has graced American homes since the 1800s, prized for an all-white body and a brightly rooted comb.

TEMPERAMENT: Reality: Indeed, this was in fact a source of inspiration to Foghorn Oil. But Leghorns are actually considered to be shy considering his boisterous personality.

EGGS: About 200 medium-sized white eggs are expected to produce annually.

 

 

 

 

 

5 Marans Hen

Marans Hen

Marans Hen

ATTENTION: These beautiful hens come in different shades, including blue copper, golden cuckoo, and black copper.

TEMPERAMENT: These races are not the chicken most friendly, but they need little room to make for a compact yard. Their choice is fine.

EGGS: Up to 200 rich chocolate-brown eggs are going to see every year. (They won’t be the first if your children believe they’re an Easter prize!)

 

 

 

 

 

 

6 Plymouth Rock Hen

Plymouth Rock Hen

Plymouth Rock Hen

ATTENTION: The black and white feathers around their bodies are notable for their Plymouth Rock.

TEMPERAMENT: Plymouth rocks (also called Barred rocks) are a particularly smart option for beginners, and are known for their longevity, simple arrangements, and efficient egg production.

EGGS: Per year expect 200 light brown to medium brown eggs.

 

 

 

 

 

7 Rhode Island Red Hen

Rhode Island Red Hen

Rhode Island Red Hen

REMEDIATION: The feathering of Rhode Island Red can range from rusty color to black, despite the name of this American original.

TEMPERAMENT: Rhode Island’s State Bird is recognized for its robustness and its ability to fend.

EGGS: Up to 250 brown and medium eggs a year are planned. They are often regarded as a “dual function,” where both eggs and meat may be brought up.

 

 

 

 

 

8 Silkie Hen

Silkie Hen

Silkie Hen

APPEARANCE: They compensate with serious poultry panache for what these hens do not need in egg production. As a bantam bird, these charmers are intricate plumage and come in various colors. they’re smaller than any other race. Silkies are famous for their charming beauty as they are beautiful.

TEMPERAMENT: a familiar breed to beginners.

EGGS: Many lay less than 100 brown eggs a year, classified as ornamental.

 

 

 

 

 

9 Sussex Hen

Sussex Hen

Sussex Hen

APPEARANCE: this breed with eight distinct shades is greater than normal. The most often used? Black body with black collar feathers. White body.

TEMPERAMENT: The Sussex is a peaceful and curious race that would not ruin a yard and is ready to feed.

EGGS: Will make 250 or more eggs in colors ranging from brown to creamy white per year.